History Jokes:


Funny anecdotes and short stories are a great source of examples in public speeches. This website contains short funny stories, clean jokes and humorous legends of kings and queens, politicians, famous literary figures and artists from many books and sources. The styles of writers from different time periods was preserved - they often enhance the stories in an amusing way. Enjoy and have fun!

A Picture by Rubens: an Appraisal story 
Richardson, in his anecdotes of painting, says, a gentleman came to me to invite me to his house: "I have," says he, "a picture of Rubens, and it is a rare good one. There is little H. the other day came to see it, and says it is a copy. If any one says so again, I'll break his head. Pray, Mr. Richardson, will you do me the favour to come, and give me your real opinion of it?"
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Raffael: Generousity of an Artist 
Wednesday, April 16, 2008, 01:54 PM - Art History Jokes and Anecdotes, Jokes and anecdotes of famous people
Posted by Court Jester
RAFFAEL. Francis I. having received a picture of St. Michael from the hand of Raffael d'Urbino, which he much coveted, he remunerated Raffael far beyond what the painter's modesty conceived he ought to receive: the generous artist, however, made him a present of a Holy Family, painted by himself, which the courteous monarch received, saying, "That persons famous in the arts partake of the immortality of princes, and are upon a footing with them."

From Percy Anecdotes
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The legend of sir Isaac Newton and the Apple (Newton's law) 
SIR ISAAC NEWTON AND THE APPLE

One day in autumn Sir Isaac was lying on the grass under an apple tree and thinking, thinking, thinking. Suddenly an apple that had grown ripe on its branch fell to the ground by his side

"What made that apple fall?" he asked himself.

"It fell because its stem would no longer hold it to its branch," was his first thought.

But Sir Isaac was not satisfied with this answer.

"Why did it fall toward the ground ? Why should it not fall some other way just as well?" he asked.

"All heavy things fall to the ground but why do they ? Because they are heavy. That is not a good reason. For then we may ask why is anything heavy? Why is one thing heavier than another? "

When he had once begun to think about this he did not stop until he had reasoned it all out. Millions and millions of people had seen apples fall, but it was left for Sir Isaac Newton to ask why they fall. He explained it in this way:

"Every object draws every other object toward it.

The more matter an object contains the harder it draws.

The nearer an object is to another the harder it draws.

The harder an object draws other objects, the heavier it is said to be.

The earth is many millions of times heavier than an apple ; so it draws the apple toward it millions and millions of times harder than the apple can draw the other way.

The earth is millions of times heavier than any object near to or upon its surface ; so it draws every such object toward it.

This is why things fall, as we say, toward the earth.

While we know that every object draws every other object, we cannot know why it does so. We can only give a name to the force that causes this. We call that force GRAVITATION.

It is gravitation that causes the apple to fall.

It is gravitation that makes things have weight.

It is gravitation that keeps all things in their proper places.

Suppose there was no such force as gravitation, would an apple fall to the ground ? Suppose that gravitation did not draw objects toward the earth, what would happen ?

To you who, like Sir Isaac Newton, are always asking "Why?" and " How?" these questions will give something to think about.

From Thirty More Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin

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Chester Harding and Daniel Boone 
Latin language and the vicinities, painting of Rome

Chester Harding, while painting a portrait of Daniel Boone asked the great frontiersman if he had ever been lost. "No," said Boone, "I can't say as ever I was lost, but I was bewildered once for three days."

From Daniel Boone and the Wilderness Road by Henry Addington Bruce

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King Philip II and Titian's famous painting 
When Titian's famous painting of the Last
Supper arrived at the Escurial, the king, Philip
II., proposed to cut the canvas to the size of the
pannel in the refectory, where it was designed
to hang. El Mudo (Philip's "deaf and dumb" painter),
who was present, to prevent the
mutilation of so capital a work, made earnest
signs of intercession with the king, to be permitted
to copy it, and reduce it to the size of the
place assigned for it, offering to do it in the space
of six months. The king expressed some hesitation
on account of the length of time required
for the work, and was proceeding to put his design
in execution, when El Mudo repeated his
supplications in behalf of his favorite master with
more fervency than ever, offering to complete
the copy in less time than he at first demanded,
tendering at the same time his head as the punishment
if he failed. The offer was not accepted,
and execution was performed upon Titian,
accompanied with the most distressing attitudes
and distortions of El Mudo.

From Percy Anecdotes
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