History Jokes:


Funny anecdotes and short stories are a great source of examples in public speeches. This website contains short funny stories, clean jokes and humorous legends of kings and queens, politicians, famous literary figures and artists from many books and sources. The styles of writers from different time periods was preserved - they often enhance the stories in an amusing way. Enjoy and have fun!

A Small Step for Neil Armstrong 
Once, while having lunch with photographer Yousuf Karsh and his wife, Armstrong inquired about the many countries the couple had visited. Surprised, Mrs, Karsh replied, "But Mr. Armstrong, you've walked on the moon. We want to hear about your travels."
"But that's the only place I've ever been", responded Armstrong apologetically.

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Amusing story of a ring 
Saturday, March 8, 2008, 05:40 PM - British humor, history of England, Modern Age History
Posted by Court Jester
A correspondent to 'Notes and Queries ' (vol. i. series 3,
p. 36), relates the following curious anecdote : ' A gentleman,
who was in the habit of frequenting a favourite spot for the
sake of a view that interested him, used to lounge on a rail,
and one day in a fit of absence of mind got fumbling about
the post in which one end of the rail was inserted. On his
way home he missed a valuable ring ; he went back again
and looked diligently for it but without success. A considerable
time afterwards in visiting his old haunt, and indulging
in his usual fit of absence, he was very agreeably
surprised to find the ring on his finger again, and which
appears to have been occasioned by (in both instances),
his pressing his finger in the aperture of the post, which
just fitted sufficiently with a pressure to hold the ring. I
afterwards tried the experiment at the spot, and found it
perfectly easy to have been effected with an easily fitting
ring.'
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The Oxford Dragon 
Jacob Bobart the younger, and son of a German
horticulturist of the same name, who superintended
the Physic Garden in Oxford, in the
seventeenth century, once played an ingenious
hoax on the learned of that university. He
found a large dead rat in the garden, and transformed
it by art into the shape of a dragon, as
represented in old and curious books of natural
history, particularly in Aldrovandus. This was
shown to various learned men, all of whom believed
it to be a genuine and invaluable specimen
of the dragon. Many fine copies of verses were
written by the literati, in honor of Bobart and
his matchless discovery, and persons flocked
from all parts to see it. Bobart owned the cheat
some years after, but it was for a long time preserved
as a masterpiece of art.

From The Percy Anecdotes
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Peter the Great's fool 
Friday, February 29, 2008, 09:13 PM - Jokes and anecdotes of famous people, Modern Age History, Satire
Posted by Administrator
Often by Peter's side at table, and in his cups, was to
be seen an individual addressed as the "Patriarch of
Russia," and sometimes as the "King of Siberia." He
was attired in sacerdotal robes, and covered with loosely-
hung gold and silver medals, which sounded musically as
he moved. It was a favourite trick with Peter, when he
and the Patriarch were equally drunk, to suddenly overturn
him, chair and all, and exhibit the reverend gentleman
with his heels in the air. There is record of a similar
fool in the person of the "King of the Samoieds." He
was a Pole who was boarded, and who received a rouble
monthly, for entertaining the Czar and court by the
exercise of such small wit as was reckoned at such
low worth. This title of " King of the Samoieds " was
usually conferred by Peter on what may be styled his
occasional fools. Thus, meeting among the patients at
the "Water Cure," at Alonaitz, in 1719, a Portuguese
Jew, whose singularities and comic bearing delighted the
Czar, the latter first promoted him to the equivocal distinction
of "titular count," and then conferred on him
the fool's royalty in the Kingship of the Samoieds. The
most burlesque of coronations was subsequently performed
in Peter's presence. It was to some such rank
that the Czar elevated his own old writing-master, Sotoff;
and it may be observed that when the Russian priests remonstrated
against his distinguishing his fools by the title
of "patriarchs," he changed the rank and addressed them
as "priests."

From The history of court fools by John Doran
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Prince of Wales and a German oboe player 
Another joke was played off upon poor Fischer
by the Prince of Wales this merrymaking season,
to this effect: after the concert, which Fischer
attended twice a week at Richmond or at Kew,
wherever the King and Queen were, he used eagerly
to seize upon the supper before he went to London.
Upon one occasion the Prince came in and said, ' I
have ordered something that I know you like;' a
dish was brought in, and when the cover was lifted,
out jumped a rabbit. Germans have a particular
dislike to that animal in every shape and form ;
therefore it is easy to conjecture poor Fischer's
state of mind. This joke cost him only the loss of his
supper, but many nights succeeded before he could
be prevailed upon to again enter the eating-room.


From Court and Private Life in the Time of Queen Charlotte by Charlotte Louise Henrietta Papendiek
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