History Jokes: The legend of sir Isaac Newton and the Apple (Newton's law)


Funny anecdotes and short stories are a great source of examples in public speeches. This website contains short funny stories, clean jokes and humorous legends of kings and queens, politicians, famous literary figures and artists from many books and sources. The styles of writers from different time periods was preserved - they often enhance the stories in an amusing way. Enjoy and have fun!

The legend of sir Isaac Newton and the Apple (Newton's law) 
SIR ISAAC NEWTON AND THE APPLE

One day in autumn Sir Isaac was lying on the grass under an apple tree and thinking, thinking, thinking. Suddenly an apple that had grown ripe on its branch fell to the ground by his side

"What made that apple fall?" he asked himself.

"It fell because its stem would no longer hold it to its branch," was his first thought.

But Sir Isaac was not satisfied with this answer.

"Why did it fall toward the ground ? Why should it not fall some other way just as well?" he asked.

"All heavy things fall to the ground — but why do they ? Because they are heavy. That is not a good reason. For then we may ask why is anything heavy? Why is one thing heavier than another? "

When he had once begun to think about this he did not stop until he had reasoned it all out. Millions and millions of people had seen apples fall, but it was left for Sir Isaac Newton to ask why they fall. He explained it in this way: —

"Every object draws every other object toward it.

The more matter an object contains the harder it draws.

The nearer an object is to another the harder it draws.

The harder an object draws other objects, the heavier it is said to be.

The earth is many millions of times heavier than an apple ; so it draws the apple toward it millions and millions of times harder than the apple can draw the other way.

The earth is millions of times heavier than any object near to or upon its surface ; so it draws every such object toward it.

This is why things fall, as we say, toward the earth.

While we know that every object draws every other object, we cannot know why it does so. We can only give a name to the force that causes this. We call that force GRAVITATION.

It is gravitation that causes the apple to fall.

It is gravitation that makes things have weight.

It is gravitation that keeps all things in their proper places.

Suppose there was no such force as gravitation, would an apple fall to the ground ? Suppose that gravitation did not draw objects toward the earth, what would happen ?

To you who, like Sir Isaac Newton, are always asking "Why?" and " How?" these questions will give something to think about.

From Thirty More Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin

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Isaac Newton and his dog 
Wednesday, March 26, 2008, 12:28 AM - British humor, history of England, Dogs, Cats and other Animals featured in Jokes
Posted by Court Jester
While Newton was attending divine service in a winter
morning, he had left in his study a favourite little
dog called Diamond. Upon returning from chapel
he found that it had overturned a lighted taper on
his desk, which set fire to several papers on which
he had recorded the results of some optical experiments.
These papers are said to have contained the
labours of many years, and it has been stated that
when Mr. Newton perceived the magnitude of his loss,
he exclaimed, " Oh, Diamond, Diamond, little do you
know the mischief you have done me!"

From The Life of Sir Isaac Newton by David Brewster


See also:
Sir Isaac Newton and the Apple
Dog training ideas
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Lord Byron's gift 
Monday, March 24, 2008, 10:59 PM - British humor, history of England, Jokes and anecdotes of famous people
Posted by Court Jester
Byron once gave his publisher, John Murray, a splendidly bound Bible, and the recipient was proud of it until he happened to discover that his friend donor had altered the last verse of the 18th chapter of St. John (Now Barrabas was a robber) so as to read: "Now Barrabas was a publisher."

From The poetical works of lord Byron, with illustr. by K. Halswelle
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Descartes refuted 
Latin language and the vicinities, painting of Rome

In 1649, René Descartes, a famous French philosopher and the author of the "Cogito ergo sum" principle, accepted the invitation of Queeen Christina of Sweden, who was deeply interested in philosophy, and traveled to Stockholm. As he explained to her majesty the basics of his mechanistic philosophy, comparing all living beings to mechanisms, the queen remarked that she had never heard of a watch giving birth to little baby watches.

See also: Watchmaker argument

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Pyrrhic victory 
Monday, March 24, 2008, 01:57 PM - Ancient history jokes and anecdotes, Greek and Roman, Famous funny quotes and sayings
Posted by Court Jester
Pyrrhus, after his victory ofer the Romans, near the river Siris, said to those sent to congratulate him, "One more such victory and Pyrrhus is undone."

From Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: Giving the Derivation, Source, Or Origin of Common Phrases, Allusions and Words that have a Tale to Tell by Ebenezer Cobham Brewer
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