History Jokes:


Funny anecdotes and short stories are a great source of examples in public speeches. This website contains short funny stories, clean jokes and humorous legends of kings and queens, politicians, famous literary figures and artists from many books and sources. The styles of writers from different time periods was preserved - they often enhance the stories in an amusing way. Enjoy and have fun!

Leo Tolstoy - practical pacifism. 
Tolstoy was a great pacifist and was once lecturing on the need to be nonresistant and nonviolent towards all creatures. Someone in the audience responded by asking what should be done if one was attacked in the woods by a tiger. Tolstoy responded, "Do the best you can. It doesn't happen very often."


view entry ( 975 views )   |  permalink
Lord Byron's Childe Harold: a literary anecdote 
Thursday, October 16, 2008, 08:03 PM - Anecdotes and jokes about writers, philosophers and scientists, British humor, history of England
Posted by Administrator
Mr Dallas, who so ably fulfilled the duties of accoucheur
to the Childe, was also resolved that it
should not come into the world without a sufficient
enunciation ; and, accordingly, prepared a review of
it for a literary journal to be published immediately
on the appearance of the poem. By a very awkward
mistake, however, the review appeared before
the thing reviewed ; and Byron was greatly vexed,
from a very likely supposition that he would be
considered the author of it. Mr. Dallas, however,
explained, and the matter was made up.
view entry ( 739 views )   |  permalink
Sir Arthur Evans: a saddened archaeologist 
Sir Arthur Evans (July 8, 1851 – July 11, 1941), a British archaeologist most famous for unearthing the palace of Knossos on the island of Crete, was entertaining a group of friends on his 90th birthday. One of his guests mentioned that the Germans had destroyed Knossos. Evans was so devastated by this news that he only lived three days past that fateful evening. The sad irony lies in the fact that Evans' guest was misinformed. The Germans did not destroy the palace. On the contrary, precautions had been made by them to ensure that the ancient ruin suffered no damage whatsoever.
view entry ( 727 views )   |  permalink
Erigena and the King (the original Irish joke) 
One day tho king and Erigena sat on opposite sides of the
table, with the courtiers ranged around. The scholar—through
forgetfulness or ignorance—transgressed some of the rules of etiquette,
so as to offend the fastidious taste of those who sat by, upon which,
the king asked him what was the difference between a Scot* and a
sot (Quid distat inter Scottum et Sottum?). "
"Tabula tantum" (Just the breadth of the table)," said Erigena; and it is more
than likely that the royal witling ventured on no more puns, for
that day at least, at the scholar's expense. Erigena is said to have
died in France some time previous to the year 877.


* A Scot then meant a native of Ireland

view entry ( 699 views )   |  permalink
Irish Air 
Lady Carteret, wife of the Lord Lieutenant, said to Swift one day, "The air of Ireland is excellent and healthy." "For God's sake, madam," said Swift, falling down before her, "don't say so in England, for if you do they will tax it."

From The Book of Three Hundred Anecdotes
view entry ( 490 views )   |  permalink

<<First | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | Next> Last>>


Privacy Policy