History Jokes: Napoleon's Secretary


Funny anecdotes and short stories are a great source of examples in public speeches. This website contains short funny stories, clean jokes and humorous legends of kings and queens, politicians, famous literary figures and artists from many books and sources. The styles of writers from different time periods was preserved - they often enhance the stories in an amusing way. Enjoy and have fun!

Napoleon's Secretary 
Monday, March 17, 2008, 01:03 AM - History of France, Jokes and anecdotes of famous people
Posted by Court Jester
In order to encourage his secretaty, Bourrienne,
under the arduous labour that he continually imposed upon
him, Bonaparte would sometimes say, " Bourrienne! we shall
go down to posterity together!" The vanity of this hope was
shown in the answer Ś "Can you tell me who was the secretary
of Alexander?"
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Cato and statues 
Sunday, March 16, 2008, 12:52 AM - Ancient history jokes and anecdotes, Greek and Roman, Jokes and anecdotes of famous people
Posted by Court Jester
Cato, on observing that statues were being
set up in honour of many, remarked, "I would
rather people would ask, why is there not a statue
to Cato, than why there is."

From Greek Wit: A Collection of Smart Sayings and Anecdotes by Frederick Apthorp Paley
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Caesar and the pilot 
Once he had taken ship in disguise to cross the Adriatic Sea, and the helmsman, terrified by the adverse wind, dared not pursue his course. But Caesar said to him, " Fear not, my friend! You carry Caesar and his fortunes!"

From the Bible for Leaners
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Caesar's wife must be above suspicion! 
Bona Dea (Lat. "the Good Goddess "), in Roman myth, a divinity also known as Fauna or Fatua and described as the sister, daughter or wife of Faunus. Her worship was exclusively confined to women in somuch that men were not even allowed to know her name. Being the goddess of fertility her rites degenerated from rustic simplicity in their original environment to unseemly license in the metropolis. The matrons of the noblest families in Rome met by night in the house of the highest official of the state. Only women were permitted to attend. The breach of this rule by Clodius, an aristocratic profligate who was in love with Caesar's wife, Pompeia, and assumed female disguise to gain admittance to the festival occasioned a great scandal. Though there was no direct evidence of collusion on the part of Pompeia, Caesar divorced her on the famous plea that "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion."


From Heroes and Heroines of Fiction, Classical MediŠval, Legendary by William Shepard Walsh
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Lincoln and a Soldier's Request for Furlough 
President Lincoln received the following pertinent letter
from an indignant private, which speaks for itself: "Dear
President I have been in the service eighteen months, and
1 have never received a cent. I desire a furlough for
fifteen days, in order to return home and remove my family
to the poor house/ The President granted the furlough.
It's a good story and true.

From Old Abe's Jokes: Fresh from Abraham's Bosom.
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